Davar
Jewish Agency chairman Isaac Herzog: "Many Jews see Israel as a stable country with a good health system." (Photograph: Yonatan Blum)
special interview
Aliyah, Anti-Semitism and the Jewish Agency

"We need to prepare for a huge wave of immigration to Israel," says Jewish Agency chairman Isaac Herzog

"Our cautious estimate is that we will see a wave of 100,000 Jews moving to Israel in the next two years" | "We've seen disturbing events in synagogues in Los Angeles, Alabama, Ukraine," says Herzog, addressing Anti-Semitism, "and unfortunately, we will see many more."

27.04.2020, 12:02

In a special interview with Davar, on the occasion of the 72nd Israeli Independence Day, Jewish Agency chairman, Isaac Herzog, discusses two sociological phenomena which he predicts will soon manifest themselves among Jewish diaspora populations, as well as within the State of Israel in the near future.

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"I anticipate two movements after this crisis," says Herzog. "On the one hand there is going to be a massive surge of immigration (aliyah). Our cautious estimate is that we will see a wave of 100,000 Jews moving to Israel over the next two years. Many Jews see Israel as a stable country with a good health system. If there is a message that is important to get across to the government these days it is that we must be ready for a huge wave of immigration that will require serious preparation."

He also said rising anti-Semitism would contribute to a new wave of immigration. "Today, we see entire networks blaming the crisis on the Jews. This time, Chinese populations suffered the initial blows, but soon the Chinese will be forgotten, and the Jews will be newly cast as priority one targets. We witnessed severe events in synagogues in Los Angeles, Alabama, Ukraine, among other places. And unfortunately, we will see many more such phenomena."

The second trend to be anticipated is a drastic reduction in the extent of donations and revenue Israel will receive from abroad. The chairman argues that donations which ordinarily might have gone overseas “will stay mainly within the community for its own rehabilitation. The Jewish Agency, which depends on many overseas contributions, will also be hurt – as will many businesses, organizations, and associations."

The full interview will be published on Israel's Independence Day.

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Brought to press with the help of the International Relations Division of the Histadrut

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